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Artificial Intelligence (AI)

Ethics, readings, help, and tools for AI in an academic and research setting. Includes a comparative table (AI matrix) of various AI tools/platforms.

Citing AI Platforms by Citation Style

Each citation style has different recommendations for citing generative AI tools like ChatGPT. Either way, you will need to know the following bits of information: The author of the software (software authors are often corporations, not individual people); full title of the software; version that you used; and date that version was published.

APA Guideline: https://apastyle.apa.org/blog/how-to-cite-chatgpt

Examples:

APA format:  OpenAI. (Year). ChatGPT (Month Day version) [Large language model]. https://chat.openai.com

APA reference entry: OpenAI. (2023). ChatGPT (Feb 13 version) [Large language model]. https://chat.openai.com

APA in-text citation: (OpenAI, 2023)

MLA Guideline: https://style.mla.org/citing-generative-ai/

Examples:

MLA format: “Text of prompt” prompt. ChatGPT, Day Month version, OpenAI, Day Month Year, chat.openai.com.

MLA Works Cited entry: “Explain antibiotics” prompt. ChatGPT, 13 Feb. version, OpenAI, 16 Feb. 2023, chat.openai.com.

MLA in-text citation: ("Explain antibiotics")

Chicago Guideline: https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Documentation/faq0422.html

Example:

1. Text generated by ChatGPT, March 31, 2023, OpenAI, https://chat.openai.com.

IEEE has not published an official guideline on citing AI-generated content yet.

The IEEE Author Center recommends consulting the Chicago Manual of Style for guidance for any usage not included in the IEEE Editorial Style Manual.

When Should I Cite AI?

If you choose to use ChatGPT or some other AI technology for writing, be sure you are transparent about your use of it with your teachers and publishers and working within their policies.

When AI tools directly impact methodology or findings, cite them. When they simply aid your process, no citation is necessary. Authors retain responsibility for the final published content.

  • Seeking literature - Likely not, unless you have to note your approach/method to gathering said literature
  • Systematic reviews - Yes, cite search/screening methods
  • Data collection/analysis - Yes, cite as method
  • Writing/editing assistance - No citation needed; author responsibility
  • Brainstorming or outlining paper - Likely not
  • Summarizing literature to be used in paper - Yes
Subjects: Interdisciplinary